Drowned in Soundcloud

Soundcloud + DrownedinSound.com x Tumblr = THIS audio-only blog. If you would like to send us your music or listen to our public open-demo-pile click-clack here. Follow a feed of this blog on Twitter, HypeM or Facebook. This blog is run by Sean Adams his personal tumblr is here.

September 22, 2014 at 10:15am
3 notes
DiS: A lot of people have been touched so personally and emotionally by your music. How does that make you feel?

Perfume Genius: If I let myself think about it, it’s very moving and it’s cheesy but it is the most important part of everything I’m doing. I think people connect with music because they simply need to. That’s why I’m very serious when I listen to music or watch movies, it’s what I want - to really be deeply moved or to really relate to something. I think I try to make music that would have that same quality. A lot of the time when I’m writing, I’ll write things that would - if I had heard them now or earlier in my life - would be a comfort to me or would sound like someone saying what I’m thinking that I’m maybe ashamed of or scared of and just hearing someone else say it. It’s a very moving thing. It’s weird to talk about because I feel like actresses when they’re always [puts both hands on cheeks and gushing] going like that, y’know? [laughs] I’ve had a lot of times where I’m just like, hugging people and we say ‘I love you’ to each other - like, I’m saying this to people I’ve just met. I’m also overly emotional, so sometimes I’m not as good at responding as I wish I would be just because it’s almost too much. In person I’m better but if something overwhelms me, I have a tendency of just closing off.

Read Sammy Maine’s full interview.

DiS: A lot of people have been touched so personally and emotionally by your music. How does that make you feel?

Perfume Genius: If I let myself think about it, it’s very moving and it’s cheesy but it is the most important part of everything I’m doing. I think people connect with music because they simply need to. That’s why I’m very serious when I listen to music or watch movies, it’s what I want - to really be deeply moved or to really relate to something. I think I try to make music that would have that same quality. A lot of the time when I’m writing, I’ll write things that would - if I had heard them now or earlier in my life - would be a comfort to me or would sound like someone saying what I’m thinking that I’m maybe ashamed of or scared of and just hearing someone else say it. It’s a very moving thing. It’s weird to talk about because I feel like actresses when they’re always [puts both hands on cheeks and gushing] going like that, y’know? [laughs] I’ve had a lot of times where I’m just like, hugging people and we say ‘I love you’ to each other - like, I’m saying this to people I’ve just met. I’m also overly emotional, so sometimes I’m not as good at responding as I wish I would be just because it’s almost too much. In person I’m better but if something overwhelms me, I have a tendency of just closing off.

Read Sammy Maine’s full interview.

September 17, 2014 at 11:43am
8 notes
I was in a band called mclusky. It was a pretty good band. We were together for a few years and made three records, the second two of which were proper records that we were, in turn, properly proud of. The second, ‘mclusky do dallas’, was our best known record. Germans liked it (and that is no comment on Germans - they mostly(↓2) hated the third record and developed this hatred into a huge indifference for Future of the Left, my/our next band) because it basically Motorheaded the Pixies. The French didn’t like it (and that is no comment on the French - they mostly(↓3) liked the third record and developed this into what seems to be a genuine passion for Future of the Left) for what seemed to be the exact same reasons. The Dutch didn’t notice (see (↓2) and (↓3)). Australians fucking loved it. They called us cunts, but that was okay, because cunts turned out to be great(↓4). Americans stood still but said they enjoyed it and interacted with us on stage the best, probably because our accents seemed a bit fruity to them and made us appear 18 per cent funnier than we actually were (which was quite funny). We went all over the (gig-going) world, apart from Japan. We didn’t sell that many records but then again didn’t expect to. It is my sincerest belief, however, that if we’d been an American rock band with the attendant coverage from the music weeklies who, at the time, still bore some relevance(↓5), then we’d have sold four or five times fuck all and played some bigger shows but then again, really, who gives a fuck? Me. This guy. I give a fuck, only not quite as much as I used to.

About thirty seven per cent less, by recent estimates.

It wasn’t the happiest band in the world. Which one is? Counting Crows? We were poor. Poor-poor. Like with a lot of bands at that cursed nearly-perhaps-level, it was fine but it was no money, living off hope and experience and eating a lot of bread sandwiches (↓6). Following the classical model we toured too much to hold down jobs and earned too little to do anything else. One band member ‘accidentally’ stole some money he didn’t think the others knew about like a low-budget pre-Libertine without a set of step-ladders but other than that there was nothing particularly dramatic to help hasten the end, just a gradual erosion of feeling over a number of years coupled with the slow, silent sadness of something inevitably dying. I spent the last US tour that we undertook with our original drummer (who I won’t name, for fear of making him happy(↓7)) wandering between the two cliques which had developed in our touring party, one a tortured, scatological bromance and the other more awkwardly heterosexual until the point where it was all I could do to sleep in the van or the corridor, alone in the band I had created. Hardly anybody was at the shows. So far so fucking Trent Reznor (↓8). Luckily, I then met Jack (Egglestone) who became our (and then Future of the Left’s) drummer, somebody who may be the sweetest man in rock (unless you have a particularly strong aversion to simulated trumpet noises or public belly-scratching) and things got significantly better. We did one more album and it was fun, even if the record in question didn’t sound it. READ ON…

I was in a band called mclusky. It was a pretty good band. We were together for a few years and made three records, the second two of which were proper records that we were, in turn, properly proud of. The second, ‘mclusky do dallas’, was our best known record. Germans liked it (and that is no comment on Germans - they mostly(↓2) hated the third record and developed this hatred into a huge indifference for Future of the Left, my/our next band) because it basically Motorheaded the Pixies. The French didn’t like it (and that is no comment on the French - they mostly(↓3) liked the third record and developed this into what seems to be a genuine passion for Future of the Left) for what seemed to be the exact same reasons. The Dutch didn’t notice (see (↓2) and (↓3)). Australians fucking loved it. They called us cunts, but that was okay, because cunts turned out to be great(↓4). Americans stood still but said they enjoyed it and interacted with us on stage the best, probably because our accents seemed a bit fruity to them and made us appear 18 per cent funnier than we actually were (which was quite funny). We went all over the (gig-going) world, apart from Japan. We didn’t sell that many records but then again didn’t expect to. It is my sincerest belief, however, that if we’d been an American rock band with the attendant coverage from the music weeklies who, at the time, still bore some relevance(↓5), then we’d have sold four or five times fuck all and played some bigger shows but then again, really, who gives a fuck? Me. This guy. I give a fuck, only not quite as much as I used to.

About thirty seven per cent less, by recent estimates.

It wasn’t the happiest band in the world. Which one is? Counting Crows? We were poor. Poor-poor. Like with a lot of bands at that cursed nearly-perhaps-level, it was fine but it was no money, living off hope and experience and eating a lot of bread sandwiches (↓6). Following the classical model we toured too much to hold down jobs and earned too little to do anything else. One band member ‘accidentally’ stole some money he didn’t think the others knew about like a low-budget pre-Libertine without a set of step-ladders but other than that there was nothing particularly dramatic to help hasten the end, just a gradual erosion of feeling over a number of years coupled with the slow, silent sadness of something inevitably dying. I spent the last US tour that we undertook with our original drummer (who I won’t name, for fear of making him happy(↓7)) wandering between the two cliques which had developed in our touring party, one a tortured, scatological bromance and the other more awkwardly heterosexual until the point where it was all I could do to sleep in the van or the corridor, alone in the band I had created. Hardly anybody was at the shows. So far so fucking Trent Reznor (↓8). Luckily, I then met Jack (Egglestone) who became our (and then Future of the Left’s) drummer, somebody who may be the sweetest man in rock (unless you have a particularly strong aversion to simulated trumpet noises or public belly-scratching) and things got significantly better. We did one more album and it was fun, even if the record in question didn’t sound it. READ ON…

September 15, 2014 at 2:48pm
3 notes

The Neptune Album Prize - 2014's 12 Shortlisted LPs Revealed →

September 4, 2014 at 7:41pm
3 notes

Playlist: Sounds Like Summer 2014 →

September 1, 2014 at 7:46pm
1 note

Fear You're Missing Out On Great Records and Reads? Subscribe to DiS →

Our August playlist and best bits digest just went to DiS subscribers. Sign up to ensure you don’t miss September’s hand-picked selection of songs.

August 29, 2014 at 3:38pm
11 notes
Reblogged from seaninsound
seaninsound:

Done one of those letter from the editor posts. Not sure it’ll catch ok?

seaninsound:

Done one of those letter from the editor posts. Not sure it’ll catch ok?

August 28, 2014 at 5:25pm
0 notes

Win tickets to see Kwabs at Chadderton Baths in Manchester →

August 27, 2014 at 7:41pm
15 notes

They… were… ParaMORE! And they were undeniably amazing at Reading festival.

As a super-professional and yet still endearing arena band, as a giving-it-everything festival headline band, as a new-sort-of-pop band, as heroes of young girls (and young boys) (and older folks too), as a GreenDay for 2014, as Nirvana to Katy Perry’s Hanson…. this is as good as it gets.
Read the full review.

2:28pm
11 notes

Donating all proceedings from tonight’s concert to a bank vault in Switzerland, Sunday’s headliners are the Antitax Moneytrees. Cocking cock Alex Turner cockily cocks his way onto the stage looking about as sorry as Lance Armstrong pleasuring himself into the sleeve of a yellow jersey. What does Turner feel as he stares out from under his retro quiff at the people he is loath to support? At the society to which he contributes as little as possible? Is it contempt? Pity? Alienation? Remorse? He sings some of his old songs that were actually about things and some of his new songs that are about nothing at all. Slurring about his love of Sheffield while poncing about dressed as Nowhere Boy: The Vegas Years, Turner appears to have as little genuine affinity with contemporary Yorkshire as the Neptune branch of the Hard Rock Cafe. Oh, and he refuses to smile the whole time, as observed by a bloke at the urinals later: “he can fuck off if he can’t even be bothered to look like he’s enjoying it.” Like my neighbouring urinator, I too have decided to tax Turner 50% of my attention by leaving halfway through. I’ll give the final word to another grumpy member of the crowd who summarised the Moneytrees’ set more eloquently than I ever could with a penetrating heckle unleashed after just a handful of dull rock numbers: “fuck off back to the fucking Brit Awards you fucking fuck!”

— A New Generation of Acts Reign Supreme at (Reading &) Leeds 2014 / In Depth // Drowned In Sound

2:27pm
1 note

A New Generation of Acts Reign Supreme at (Reading &) Leeds 2014 →

2:19pm
1 note

50 Words for Kate Bush's comeback show →

August 22, 2014 at 8:47am
40 notes

If you watch something like X Factor you see a million girls wanting to sound like Beyoncé or Rihanna or Adele - maybe if there were more women playing in bands then there would be more girls wanting to be the bassist or the drummer instead of automatically being the singer. I don’t know if I would have had the courage to put everything into a band if it wasn’t for all the positive role models I had. Like Babes In Toyland who I saw at the LA2 while I was still at school and it changed my life! That’s when I realised I wanted to play like that and wear a dress. The two appealed to me very much.

— Laura-Mary from Blood Red Shoes ahead of performing on the main stage of Reading this afternoon. via Guyliners: Why Do UK Festivals Have So Few Female Headliners?

August 14, 2014 at 11:24am
74 notes
Reblogged from propertyofzack

Drowned In Sound: Does My Enjoyment Of blink-182 Make Me A Bad Feminist?

propertyofzack:

image

Sammy Maine penned a column  for Drowned In Sound surrounding the idea of how blink-182 plays into feminism for feminists. What do you think? A lyric like “I need a girl that I can train” is front and center on one end while Tom DeLonge’s continual support of Keep A Breast is on the other.

Related Stories:
blnk-182 Promise To Hit The Studio By End Of 2014 

Read More

August 10, 2014 at 7:53pm
2 notes
Reblogged from underachievers-please-try-harder

Interview // Sylvan Esso →

underachievers-please-try-harder:

“You’re constantly fighting with yourself not use the societal rules that you’ve learned, right? Sometimes you’ll find yourself being a fucking asshole, holding up women – or men – to different standards because of their gender. It’s about recognising the really subtle differences, and figuring out how to name those, and jump over them.”

June 27, 2014 at 11:39am
2 notes
Reblogged from seaninsound

seaninsound:

We’ve made you a half-year playlist http://drownedinsound.com/in_depth/4147897-our-favourite-songs-of-2014—dis-staff-half-year-mixtape